Engaged Families and Communities

Family-School-Community Partnerships 2.0: Collaborative Strategies to Advance Student Learning

In local communities across the country, NEA affiliate members and leaders are working closely with parents, families, and community members to close achievement gaps, improve low-performing schools, and transform relationships between schools and their communities.

This report identifies and describes key partnerships that Association members have forged in 16 communities and includes the Association perspective on these efforts.

Part I of this report reviews recent research on school and family collaboration and presents 10 key strategies for creating effective family- school-community partnerships that are focused on advancing student learning. It also includes recommendations for moving this important work forward.

Part II contains profiles for each of the 16 partnership programs. In many cases, Association members have been catalysts for or taken on key roles in these effective programs. These profiles demonstrate very clearly that family-school-community partnerships with a central focus on advancing student learning can have a powerful impact.

Click on the link below to download the full report.
Family-School-Community Partnerships 2.0: Collaborative Strategies to Advance Student Learning

For the Executive Summary, click link below:
Executive Summary

To learn about each of the 16 programs individually, navigate the links below:

Community and Family-Community Programs
Making Parents Count
James A. Shanks Middle School, Quincy, Florida

Wicomico Mentoring Project
Wicomico County Public Schools, Salisbury, Maryland

Bringing Learning to Life
Columbus City Schools, Columbus, Ohio

Programs to Engage Parents and Other Family Members
Academic Parent-Teacher Teams
Creighton Elementary School District, Phoenix, Arizona

Parent-Teacher Home Visit Project
Sacramento City Unified School District, Sacramento, California

Revitalizing the Title I School-Parent Compact
Geraldine W. Johnson Elementary-Middle School, Bridgeport, Connecticut

Climate and Culture Committee
Math and Science Leadership Academy, Denver, Colorado

Hispanic Parents Council
Capt. James E. Daly Jr. Elementary School, Germantown, Maryland

Infinite Campus Parent Portal, Ninth Grade Outreach Program
Washoe County School District, Reno, Nevada

Before- and After-School Support Programs
Elmont Memorial Junior-Senior High School, Elmont, New York

Compadres in Education
Putnam City West High School, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Successful Transitions
Upper Merion Area Middle School, King of Prussia, Pennsylvania

Parent and Community Outreach Initiative
Reading School District, Reading, Pennsylvania

Wraparound Social and Community Services Programs
Community-School Programs
Evansville Vanderburgh School Corporation, Evansville, Indiana

Lincoln Community Learning Centers
Lincoln Public Schools, Lincoln, Nebraska

SUN Service System
8 school districts in Multnomah County, Portland, Oregon

View more articles in: Engaged Families and Communities Resources

7 responses to “Family-School-Community Partnerships 2.0: Collaborative Strategies to Advance Student Learning”

  1. NEA’s Priority Schools Campaign Releases Family-School-Community Partnership Guide : Priority Schools Campaign November 11, 20113:41 pm

    [...] the National Education Association (NEA), joined by Parenting magazine, released the “Family-School-Community Partnerships 2.0,” a tool to  help educators develop more connections between the most important people in their [...]
    Like or dislike? 135
  2. Annenberg Guide Offers Strategies for Education Organizing : Priority Schools Campaign February 2, 201210:00 am

    [...] between schools and their communities. Sixteen of these partnerships are profiled in the NEA’s Family-School-Community Partnerships 2.0 report, and more through the Priority Schools [...]
    Like or dislike? 128
  3. Family-School-Community Partnerships Webinar : Priority Schools Campaign March 3, 201212:15 pm

    [...] the National Education Association and Anne Henderson, lead author of the Family-School-Community Partnerships 2.0 guide, for a webinar on Thursday, March 29 from 4:00 to 5:15 PM Eastern Time. To access the webinar, [...]
    Like or dislike? 124
  4. Parent Partnership Solutions : Priority Schools Campaign July 7, 20125:09 pm

    [...] outlined six of the most common communication challenges reported by respondents, along with field-tested solutions to solving the [...]
    Like or dislike? 103
  5. Engaging Parents In School… » “Parent Partnership Solutions” July 7, 201212:45 pm

    [...] outlined six of the most common communication challenges reported by respondents, along with field-tested solutions to solving the [...]
    Like or dislike? 113
  6. 10 Ways to Build Better Partnerships : Priority Schools Campaign August 8, 20125:13 pm

    [...] partnerships that are focused on advancing student learning, taken from NEA’s Family-School-Community Community Partnerships 2.0: Collaborative Strategies to Advance Student Lear... [...]
    Like or dislike? 99
  7. 10 ways to build better partnerships | Education Votes September 9, 201210:14 am

    [...] by Amy Buffenbarger Here are 10 key strategies for creating effective family- school-community partnerships that are focused on advancing student learning, taken from NEA’s Family-School-Community Community Partnerships 2.0: Collaborative Strategies to Advance Student Lear... report. [...]
    Like or dislike? 92

Speak Your Mind

Tell us what you're thinking...and oh, if you want a pic to show with your comment, go get a Gravatar!

Spotlight

Classroom Superheroes

Educators in priority schools are rising to a superhero challenge every single day. Nominate educators in your community and support others at classroomsuperheroes.com

Visit the site »

PSC Superhero Keith G. Pemberton

Keith G. Pemberton is a social worker at Oak Hill Elementary School in High Point, N.C., where he has built a strong and steady pipeline for parental involvement, specifically among fathers and male mentors. Check out his Classroom Superhero profile and leave some words of encouragement.

Visit the site »